Sanjiv M Narayan

Sanjiv M Narayan

Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine

Stanford University Medical Center, US

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Biography

Prof Narayan is a professor of medicine and a cardiologist at Stanford University, and a biomedical engineer. Prof Narayan is co-founder and a director of the Stanford Arrhythmia Center, whose mission is to develop world-leading therapy based on patient centered research for heart rhythm disorders.

Academic appointments :

  • Professor, Med Center Line, Medicine - Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Member, Bio-X
  • Member, Cardiovascular Institute.

Administrative appointments

  • Co-Director, Stanford Arrhythmia Center (2016-present)
  • Director, Atrial Fibrillation Program, Stanford Medicine (2014-present)
  • Director, Electrophysiology Research, Stanford Medicine (2014-present)
  • Co-Director, Electrophysiology Program, University of California, San Diego (2008-2014)
  • Director, Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology Fellowship Training Program, University of California, San Diego (2008-2012)
  • Director, Electrophysiology Program, Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System (2001-2014).

Articles

What Cannot Be Missed: Important Publications on Electrophysiology in 2020

Sanjiv M Narayan, Hugh Calkins, Andrew Grace, et al

Published:

Citation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review 2021;10(1):5–6.

What Cannot Be Missed: Important Publications on Electrophysiology in 2019

Andrew Grace, Hugh Calkins, Ken Ellenbogen, et al

Published:

Citation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review 2020;9(1):4.

Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Drivers

Tina Baykaner, Junaid Zaman, Paul J Wang, et al

Citation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review 2017;6(4):195–201.

Role of Rotors in the Ablative Therapy of Persistent Atrial Fibrillation

Amir A Schricker, Junaid Zaman, Sanjiv M Narayan, et al

Citation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review 2015;4(1):47–52

Targeting Stable Rotors to Treat Atrial Fibrillation

Sanjiv M Narayan, David E Krummen,

Citation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology Review 2012;1(1):34–8