Transseptal puncture and catheter ablation via the superior vena cava approach for persistent atrial fibrillation in a patient with polysplenia syndrome and interruption of the inferior vena cava: contact force–guided pulmonary vein isolation

Abstract

AIMS: We sought to establish the technical feasibility of transseptal puncture and left atrial (LA) ablation through the right internal jugular vein via the superior vena cava (SVC) approach in patients with an interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC).

METHODS AND RESULTS: A 34-year-old man with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) and polysplenia syndrome (hypoplasia of the left kidney, aplasia of the pancreas tail, bilaterally bilobed lungs, and an interrupted IVC) was referred to our hospital for radiofrequency ablation. Because transseptal puncture and LA ablation would be impossible by a standard IVC approach via the femoral vein, we performed transseptal puncture and LA ablation through the right internal jugular vein via the SVC approach using a manually curved Brockenbrough needle and intracardiac echocardiographic guidance. We accomplished pulmonary vein (PV) isolation using a deflectable guiding sheath and a contact force-sensing ablation catheter to monitor the contact force and the force–time integral of the tip of the ablation catheter. No complications occurred during or after the procedure. The patient was discharged home without recurrence of AF 3 days after the procedure. He had no recurrence of AF and was taking no medication 5 months after ablation.

CONCLUSION: We successfully performed transseptal puncture in a patient with persistent AF, polysplenia syndrome, and complete interruption of the IVC using the superior route through the internal jugular vein. We also accomplished PV isolation using a deflectable guiding sheath and real-time monitoring of the contact force of the ablation catheter.

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Citation
Europace. 2017 Jul 1;19(7):1227-1232.