Reducing Cardiovascular Risk With Effective Management Of LDL Cholesterol - A Round Table Discussion

Chapter 1: Welcome and introductions

This round table is designed to provide clinicians with a better understanding of the long-term CV risks of LDL-C exposure. In addition to reviewing the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and assessing the long term implications of elevated LDL-C, this meeting will consider current guidance around controlling LDL-C, the challenges in achieving LDL-C targets, and evaluate how emerging strategies are contributing to LDL-C management.


Each chapter will comprise of a short presentation by the named medical expert followed by a panel discussion amongst all faculty.

Learning objectives

  • Outline the pathogenic nature and clinical risk of extended exposure to elevated LDL-C
  • Describe the clinical challenges in achieving guideline-based LDL-C goals
  • Compare and contrast LDL-C lowering therapies

 


Programme Outline
  • Chapter 1: Welcome and introductionsKausik (Kosh) RayLale TokgözoğluChristie BallantyneWolfgang Koenig
  • Chapter 2: The role of long-term exposure to elevated LDL-C in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and clinical riskLale Tokgözoğlu
  • Chapter 3: Current approaches to controlling LDL-C – what do the guidelines say?Christie Ballantyne
  • Chapter 4: Challenges in achieving guideline-based LDL-C targets in the real worldKausik (Kosh) Ray
  • Chapter 5: Contemporary approaches to managing LDL-C and cardiovascular riskWolfgang Koenig
  • Chapter 6: SummaryKausik (Kosh) RayLale TokgözoğluChristie BallantyneWolfgang Koenig
This medical experts round table discussion was organised independently by Radcliffe Cardiology, work that was funded by Novartis. It is intended for healthcare professionals as medical educational material, and may include data/information on investigational uses of compounds/drugs that have not yet been approved by regulatory authorities.

Chapter 2: The role of long-term exposure to elevated LDL-C in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and clinical risk