Radial artery ultrasound predicts the success of transradial coronary angiography

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The transradial approach has become the preferred vascular access during conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Hereby, we evaluated the impact of pre-procedural radial artery diameter (RAD), the cross-sectional area (CSA), and the perimeter on vascular complications (VACs).

METHODS:

We conducted a single-center prospective analysis of 513 patients who underwent CCA. Radial artery ultrasonography was performed before and after CCA to measure the RAD, CSA, and perimeter.

RESULTS:

The average RAD, CSA, and perimeter were 2.60 ± 0.48 mm, 6.2 ± 3.0 mm2, and 8.9 ± 1.7 mm, respectively. Vascular complications were reported in 56 (11%) patients. The RAD, CSA, and perimeter were significantly smaller in patients in whom procedure-related VACs were observed than in those with no complications: 2.3 ± 0.5 vs. 2.70 ± 0.54 mm (p = 0.0001), 4.9 ± 2.1 vs. 6.4 ± 3 mm2 (p = 0.001), and 7.6 ± 2.1 vs. 9.2 ± 1.6 mm (p = 0.0001), respectively. Univariate logistic regression showed that RAD, CSA and perimeter can independently predict VACs (OR 0.833, 95% CI 0.777–0.894, p < 0.0001; OR 0.647, 95% CI 0.541–0.773, p < 0.0001; OR 0.545, 95% CI 0.446–0.665, p < 0.0001, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Ultrasonographic study of the radial artery before CCA can provide valuable information regarding vascular access.

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Citation
Cardiol J. 2017;24(1):9-14.