Atrial Tachycardia

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  • Atrial tachycardia is the least common of supraventricular tachycardia, accounting for about 10–15% of patients. The mechanism may be focal, due to increased or abnormal automaticity or triggered activity, or macro re-entrant. When incessant tachycardia is present, tachycardiomyopathy may develop.

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    Atrial tachycardia is the least common of supraventricular tachycardia, accounting for about 10–15% of patients. The mechanism may be focal, due to increased or abnormal automaticity or triggered activity, or macro re-entrant. When incessant tachycardia is present, tachycardiomyopathy may develop.

    The efficacy of antiarrhythmic drugs for long-term management of atrial tachycardia is poorly defined, but is probably limited. Class IC or class I agents may be used in re-entrant atrial tachycardia, and verapamil, beta-blockers or class IC agents in focal atrial tachycardia. Vagal manoeuvres, cardioversion and pacemakers are other options for management.

    Experience with radiofrequency catheter ablation to cure atrial tachycardia is limited, but results are very promising, with high success rates and acceptably low recurrence and complication rates.

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