News Round Up from AHA Scientific Sessions 2008 - November 10th

Implantable Defibrillators, Pacemakers Affected By MP3 Headphones
10 Nov 2008
Headphones for MP3 players placed within an inch of pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) may interfere with these devices, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2008. Full news item

New Test, VENDYS(R), Helps Detect Silent Heart Disease
10 Nov 2008
Results from the latest clinical study evaluating the predictive value of VENDYS®, the new FDA-approved cardiovascular test, will be presented to cardiovascular opinion leaders and luminaries during the 2008 annual conference of the American Heart Association in New Orleans. The study shows that a simple, inexpensive test that measures temperature changes at the fingertips can help detect hidden coronary artery disease. Full news item

CRESTOR Demonstrates Dramatic CV Risk Reduction In A Large Statin Outcomes Study
10 Nov 2008
New data from the JUPITER study demonstrated that CRESTOR(R) (rosuvastatin calcium) 20 mg significantly reduced major cardiovascular (CV) events (defined in this study as the combined risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, arterial revascularization, hospitalization for unstable angina, or death from CV causes) by a dramatic 44% compared to placebo among men and women with elevated hsCRP but low to normal cholesterol levels. Full news item

One Year After Angioplasty Hispanics Less Likely To Have Repeat Revascularizations
10 Nov 2008
Hispanic patients were 57 percent less likely than Caucasian patients to undergo coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG) one year after successful angioplasty, a type of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) to open blockages in the coronary arteries. Hispanics also had a trend toward lower rates of overall repeat revascularization procedures including stenting and bypass surgery, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2008. Full news item

Cardiovascular Disease Not Prevented By Supplementation With Vitamins E Or C
10 Nov 2008
The risk of cardiovascular events is not reduced by vitamin E or vitamin C supplements, as determined in a large, long-term randomized study of male physicians, according to an article released on November 9, 2008 in JAMA to coincide with the scientific presentation of these findings at the current American Heart Association (AHA) meeting. Full news item

Hospitalizations For Heart Failure Among Seniors Rising In The US
10 Nov 2008
The number of older patients hospitalized for heart failure in the US has more than doubled in the last 27 years, which is perhaps not surprising considering that America's population is aging and more people survive heart attacks and heart disease. Full news item

Obstructive Sleep Apnea Could Be Risk Factor For Sudden Cardiac Death
10 Nov 2008
After studying the sleep characteristics of nearly 11,000 adults in an overnight sleep laboratory, Mayo Clinic researchers suggest that obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) - and, in particular, the low nighttime oxygen saturation of the blood it causes - may be a risk factor for sudden cardiac death (SCD). Full news item

UPMC Recruiting For Advanced Heart Failure Clinical Trial
10 Nov 2008
UPMC currently is enrolling for a Phase 2 clinical trial to study the effects of a genetically-targeted enzyme replacement therapy for advanced heart failure. Initial data for the study \"Calcium Up-Regulation by Percutaneous Administration of Gene Therapy in Cardiac Disease (CUPID trial)\" were recently reported at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in New Orleans, La. Full news item

Bayer's Xarelto(R) Shows Encouraging Results In Patients With Acute Coronary Syndrome
10 Nov 2008
Findings from the ATLAS ACS TIMI 46 study - a Phase II study of the novel oral anticoagulant Xarelto® (rivaroxaban) - were presented today as a late-breaking clinical trial at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2008 in New Orleans by C. Michael Gibson, M.D., Director of the TIMI Data Coordinating Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Full news item

Presentations At AHA Expand On Clinical Utility Of DeCODE's DNA-based Tests
10 Nov 2008
Several presentations by deCODE genetics (Nasdaq:DCGN) scientists and independent researchers at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2008 being held at the New Orleans Convention Center from November 8 to12 are expected to expand upon the clinical utility of evaluating individual risk of heart attack, or atrial fibrillation and stroke, respectively, by measuring the genetic markers that are the basis of the deCODE MI├óÔÇŞ╦İ and deCODE AF├óÔÇŞ╦İ tests. These tests measure single-letter variations in the human genome (SNPs) on chromosomes 9p21 and 4q25 that deCODE has linked to increased risk of these cardiovascular conditions, enabling a better understanding of individual risk. As this information is independent of other conventional risk factors, these tests provide doctors in the clinic with a new tool for improving screening, prevention and treatment. Full news item

New Early-Warning Blood Test Before Heart Attack Strikes
10 Nov 2008
A team of Johns Hopkins biochemists has identified a mixed bag of five key proteins out of thousands secreted into blood draining from the heart's blood vessels that may together or in certain quantities form the basis of a far more accurate early warning test than currently in use of impending heart attack in people with severely reduced blood flow, or ischemia. Full news item

Statins May Benefit People With Low Cholesterol
10 Nov 2008
An international trial found that the cholesterol busting drug rosuvastatin reduced heart attack and stroke in men and women with low cholesterol who had high levels of C-reactive protein but who were otherwise classed as healthy, and experts suggested this could be a class effect of all statins and not just rosuvastatin, which is marketed by AstraZeneca as Crestor. Full news item

Patients With Type 2 Diabetes In Japan, Taking Low-Dose Aspirin Does Not Significantly Reduce Cardiovascular Risk
10 Nov 2008
In patients with type 2 diabetes, low-dose aspirin does not appear to significantly reduce the risk of endpoints including coronary, cerebrovascular, and peripheral vascular events, according to a report released on November 9, 2008 in JAMA, to coincide with the results' presentation at the American Heart Association (AHA) meeting. Full news item "