COVID-19 and Cardiovascular Disease

Editor's choice

Videos

Webinars

COVID-19

Articles

Podcast Episodes

  • 27: The new reality of CVD care with Grant W Reed, Director of the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI program

    27: The new reality of CVD care with Grant W Reed, Director of the Clevelan...

    Ankur Kalra asks Grant W Reed, Director of the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI program, to reflect on the actions they took and the challenges of delaying cardiovascular procedures in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. Dr Reed offers insight on the factors that influenced the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI policy for COVID-19. Ankur and Grant discuss the triage considerations for patients with structural heart disease and the steps the clinic took to protect its healthcare workers.

  • How COVID-19 has changed the educational paradigm - Steve Elias

    How has education and training for physicians changed in light of the COVID-19 pandemic? Steve Elias, MD, meets with key industry figures from AngioDynamics, Philips, Medtronic as well as event organisers, Radcliffe Group, to gain a different perspective, this time from industry on their response to the recent pandemic.

  • Portrait of a clinician-scientist during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Jag Singh MD PhD

    Portrait of a clinician-scientist during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Jag Singh M...

    Jagmeet P Singh, a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a renowned Clinical Trialist, and the past Clinical Chief of Cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital joins Ankur Kalra for a deep conversation about his journey across three continents.

    Dr Singh talks about the importance of choosing fulfillment over success. We gain more insights on the recent late-breaking clinical trial, MADIT-CHIC focusing on cardiac resynchronization therapy. Ankur asks Jag about his experience of being on the other side of the healthcare system as a patient and his participation in an investigational drug study.

     

Gone, but not Forgotten

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

The direct impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has resulted in a shift from inpatient to offsite care, as bed utilisation is appropriated to COVID-19 patients or potential COVID-19 patients.

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 Outbreak Highlights the Importance of Sex-sensitive Medicine

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

While 2020 is only halfway through, we have already experienced a historical year in global healthcare with a high societal impact. When the first severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections were reported in China at the end of 2019, few people realised we would all be affected by a global pandemic several months later.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Heart Failure: A Multiparametric Approach

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

This review focuses on the implications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in the heart failure (HF) population. First of all, we will describe the cardiovascular implications of COVID-19 and the new practices surrounding the use of telehealth to follow up and triage patients with HF.

Anticoagulant Therapy for Patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019: Urgent Need for Enhanced Awareness

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has generated a pandemic that has heavily affected the global population, with more than 5.2 million infected and more than 337,000 deaths worldwide recorded between the end of 2019 and 24 May 2020.1 In the absence of vaccines or specific targeted treatments, strategies to reduce the COVID-19 mortality rate have gained importance as a global need.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Catheterisation Laboratory Considerations: “Looking for Essentials”

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is more than a health crisis, and its impact on the management of other diseases of various specialties is one of the greatest challenges facing healthcare professionals. Health associations worldwide are now recommending dealing with emergencies only, utilising telemedicine and providing ambulatory facilities, where available, for non-emergency conditions to control the pandemic.

Response to the Comment ‘Smoking and Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Cessation to Limit Coronavirus Disease 2019

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

Thank you very much for your interesting and important comments on our review that discussed smoking cessation to limit the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.1,2 As you pointed out, the reported number of hospitalised COVID-19 patients who are current or former smokers is small.3,4 One reason for this small number of smokers is that an unknown history of smoking may be treated as a non-smoking history.

Smoking and Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Cessation to Limit Coronavirus Disease 2019

Creative Commons Licence
 
Open access
This work is open access under the CC-BY-NC 4.0 License which allows users to copy, redistribute and make derivative works for non-commercial purposes, provided the original work is cited correctly.

We read with interest the paper by Komiyama and Hasegawa on the need for smoking cessation as a public health measure to limit the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.1 It seems obvious to reiterate that smoking cessation is advisable to reduce many other severe conditions, such as chronic lung and cardiovascular diseases and some types of cancer, which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - COVID-19 and Cardiovascular Disease