COVID-19 and Cardiovascular Disease

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  • 27: The new reality of CVD care with Grant W Reed, Director of the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI program

    27: The new reality of CVD care with Grant W Reed, Director of the Clevelan...

    Ankur Kalra asks Grant W Reed, Director of the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI program, to reflect on the actions they took and the challenges of delaying cardiovascular procedures in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. Dr Reed offers insight on the factors that influenced the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI policy for COVID-19. Ankur and Grant discuss the triage considerations for patients with structural heart disease and the steps the clinic took to protect its healthcare workers.

  • How COVID-19 has changed the educational paradigm - Steve Elias

    How has education and training for physicians changed in light of the COVID-19 pandemic? Steve Elias, MD, meets with key industry figures from AngioDynamics, Philips, Medtronic as well as event organisers, Radcliffe Group, to gain a different perspective, this time from industry on their response to the recent pandemic.

  • Portrait of a clinician-scientist during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Jag Singh MD PhD

    Portrait of a clinician-scientist during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Jag Singh M...

    Jagmeet P Singh, a Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, a renowned Clinical Trialist, and the past Clinical Chief of Cardiology at Massachusetts General Hospital joins Ankur Kalra for a deep conversation about his journey across three continents.

    Dr Singh talks about the importance of choosing fulfillment over success. We gain more insights on the recent late-breaking clinical trial, MADIT-CHIC focusing on cardiac resynchronization therapy. Ankur asks Jag about his experience of being on the other side of the healthcare system as a patient and his participation in an investigational drug study.

     

Coronavirus Disease 2019 and Catheterisation Laboratory Considerations: “Looking for Essentials”

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The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is more than a health crisis, and its impact on the management of other diseases of various specialties is one of the greatest challenges facing healthcare professionals. Health associations worldwide are now recommending dealing with emergencies only, utilising telemedicine and providing ambulatory facilities, where available, for non-emergency conditions to control the pandemic.

Response to the Comment ‘Smoking and Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Cessation to Limit Coronavirus Disease 2019

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Thank you very much for your interesting and important comments on our review that discussed smoking cessation to limit the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.1,2 As you pointed out, the reported number of hospitalised COVID-19 patients who are current or former smokers is small.3,4 One reason for this small number of smokers is that an unknown history of smoking may be treated as a non-smoking history.

Smoking and Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitor/Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Cessation to Limit Coronavirus Disease 2019

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We read with interest the paper by Komiyama and Hasegawa on the need for smoking cessation as a public health measure to limit the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.1 It seems obvious to reiterate that smoking cessation is advisable to reduce many other severe conditions, such as chronic lung and cardiovascular diseases and some types of cancer, which are leading causes of morbidity and mortality.

Coronavirus Disease 2019: Where are we and Where are we Going? Intersections Between Coronavirus Disease 2019 and the Heart

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Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has reached a pandemic level worldwide.1 Bergamo was the first western town affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and has the sad record of being the city with the highest number of COVID-19 cases and deaths, not only in the Lombardy region but also throughout Italy and the world. The first documented case at Papa Giovanni Hospital in Bergamo was recorded on 23 February 2020.

Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation in Coronavirus Disease 2019-associated Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: An Initial US Experience at a High-volume Centre

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Dear Editor,

The use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as salvage therapy in the most severe cases of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) has been associated with reduced mortality, particularly at high-volume centres. We report a case series of seven patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated ARDS treated with ECMO.

Myocardial and Microvascular Injury Due to Coronavirus Disease 2019

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In December 2019, several cases of interstitial pneumonia of unknown origin were detected in Wuhan, China, and on 9 January 2020, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was identified as the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Within a few weeks, the contagion spread through China and South Korea, and the outbreak rapidly extended worldwide due to asymptomatic cases and modern travel. Finally, on 11 March 2020, the WHO declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic.

Coronavirus Disease 2019 Myocarditis: Insights into Pathophysiology and Management

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Pathophysiology of COVID-19-related Cardiac Injury

Acute myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening disease, which is most commonly caused by a viral infection. Among the viruses, the most cited are enteroviruses (especially coxsackievirus), adenovirus and parvovirus B19 and, rarely, coronavirus.

27: The new reality of CVD care with Grant W Reed, Director of the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI program

Ankur Kalra asks Grant W Reed, Director of the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI program, to reflect on the actions they took and the challenges of delaying cardiovascular procedures in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. Dr Reed offers insight on the factors that influenced the Cleveland Clinic’s STEMI policy for COVID-19. Ankur and Grant discuss the triage considerations for patients with structural heart disease and the steps the clinic took to protect its healthcare workers.

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